Anonymous voting for Baseball Hall of Fame takes center stage in wake of lone writer denying Derek Jeter unanimous entry


Why are voters for the baseball Hall of Fame allowed to cast their ballots anonymously?

Because that’s the way the Hall of Fame wants it. And, apparently, that’s not going to change.

The issue of anonymous ballots took center stage during a painfully awkward three-minute interlude at Wednesday’s Manhattan news conference to honor new Hall of Famers Derek Jeter and Larry Walker.

One member of the Baseball Writers Association of American out of the 397 who voted in Tuesday’s election did not vote for Jeter, denying the former Yankees captain the chance to join Mariano Rivera as the second unanimous inductee in baseball history. Jeter received 99.7% of the vote.

The person who cast that ballot has, to date, not come forward.

As Jeter and Walker sat on the dais in stoned silence, Hall of Fame president Tim Mead — who was hired last April — erroneously answered a question about why anonymous ballots were allowed by saying it was the BBWAA which wanted it that way.

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