Denied from joining a segregated female league, she made history playing alongside men


As a young girl, Mamie “Peanut” Johnson loved to play baseball. Her love and passion for the game started when she was only about seven, and she went on to become the first female pitcher to play in the Negro Leagues.

She
would play baseball with her Uncle Leo “Bones” Belton. They would make bats out of tree limbs, bases out of pie
plates and balls from rocks wrapped in tape. She developed her baseball skills.

Born Mamie Belton on September 27, 1935 in Ridgeway, South Carolina, it was difficult getting to play or joining the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League as a black girl. She was not allowed anywhere on the field.

Johnson later stated, “If I had played with white girls, I would have been just another player, but now I am somebody who has done something that no other woman has done.”

Image result for mamie peanut johnson
Pic Credit: nlbm.mlblogs.com

However,
that did not deter her from becoming one of only three women to play baseball
in the Negro Leagues and historically, the only female to pitcher in the 1950s.

She attended Thorntree School, a two-room schoolhouse. Johnson lived with her maternal grandmother, Cendonia Belton since her parents were…

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